The Oxford Club Gives Investors Better Returns Without More Risk

Mark Hulbert has been evaluating financial advice newsletters for decades. He uses a clear, hard-headed and objective approach. He doesn’t fall for marketing hype. He doesn’t cherry-pick advice. He tracks every buy and sell recommendation to see how newsletter subscribers fair if they do everything the editor says.

Obviously, some newsletter subscribers make money, yet many lose. Many newsletter editors has a particular style of investing that works well when the market is favoring that style, but is a loser when the market is rewarding other types. For instance, some like large caps. Some prefer small caps. Depending on how the market is treating large and small cap stocks, their model portfolios will perform quite differently.

The Wall Street Journal has just recognized the newsletters of the Oxford Club, the Oxford Communique, as one of the top performers of the year. What’s especially notable, is that this markets twelve years they have retained the top spot. As Hulbert notes, the Oxford Communique has given above market returns without accepting extra risk, what’s called “alpha.” And they’ve done through the up and down periods of three separate market cycles.

Sometimes market advisors make a lot of money, but do so by taking on a lot of additional risk. For instance, it’s extremely risk to make one company, no matter how successful, your entire stock portfolio. When it does well, you do well, it’s true. But if it goes down for some reason, so does your wealth. Enron is a famous case of a major company that went from hero to zero in just a short time, with no warning.

If you’d like to get a same of the Oxford Club’s viewpoint, you can subscribe to their free daily email, Investment U Daily. The premium version, Investment U Plus, contains recommendations from a range of Wall Street experts that you can use right away to increase your net worth.

The Oxford Club is based in Baltimore, Maryland, but has members all over the world. Alexander Green edits the Oxford Communique, so the honor from the Wall Street Journal reflects highly on him. Follow the Oxford Club on Twitter: https://twitter.com/The_Oxford_Club

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